Barton: Karen Abbott

Friday in the Torian Auditorium writer and profound author of the book Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War Karen Abbott came to Savannah State University to discuss her book and the reason behind writing this book. Throughout her speech she basically explained how women played an important role during the Civil War and how even though these women were undercover or in disguise the role was very useful. Ms. Abbott talked about how women used their own children to relay important messages during the war. The one thing that I did admire was one of the female spy used an African American woman to help her relay messages and important information from inside the white house. This particular woman’s name was Mary Jane Bowser, a well-educated black freed slave who worked for one of the female spy by the name of Elizabeth Van Lew. The reason this woman is so important in the novel is because everyone who worked in the white house thought this black lady was uneducated and was just used for the job that she was hired for. The last thing that Ms. Abbott talked about was how women was very useful and important during this time because even though some women may have seemed or appeared uneducated those were the ones who made the changes and difference that most people never recognized.

Overall, I thought her speech was very interested and important because people in society think that women are only useful for one thing and being educated and making changes is not one of those characteristics. Another thing that I thought was interesting about her speech was how children played in an important role with delivering messages and helping their parents make a difference in history. I really enjoyed her speech and I really enjoyed listening to how even though these women may have not been recognized or wrote about in history they still played an important role that should not go unrecognized.
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