Owens: The Legend of Maureen O’ Hara

According to NPR news, Maureen O’ Hara has died in her sleep at her home in Boise, Idaho. She was 95. O’Hara’s career spanned more than 60 films, including How Green Was My Valley and the The Quiet Man, the classic 1952 romance directed by John Ford and set in Ireland. Just last year, O’Hara received a Lifetime Honorary Oscar. Now what’s interesting to know is that O’ Hara was best known for her character in The Quiet Man, why? In that role she was mistreated and played a “tough cookie” who was almost considered a dumb blond. What’s crazy about her character is the fact that she was mistreated as a women but it was considered to be a “beautiful love story between her and Sean” She literally was trying to escape him. I’m bringing this character to your attention to show that what she’s best known for is kind of degrading to her as a women.

According to NPR In one of their most famous scenes from The Quiet Man, O’Hara plays village lass Mary Kate Danaher. John Wayne plays the hero, Sean Thornton, a retired boxer who returns to his family’s ancestral home. It’s love at first sight when he spies Mary Kate in the fields, but they don’t speak. When they finally meet, he yanks her into his arms. They kiss — then she tries to hit him.

The image NPR chose for her story shows her beauty indeed, but why does it have to look likes she’s naked. If she’s so well known as prestigious how they portray her, then why is her beauty tied to nakedness and her character The Quiet Man. Also from the story line they wrote of her it states that: she stood toe-to-toe with all of the leading men she worked with, including Jimmy Stewart, Tyrone Power and Walter Pidgeon. A tall, athletic woman, O’Hara did almost all of her own stunts, including fencing. But when you keep reading it then portrays her as weak by saying: O’Hara had to be tough to endure decades of physical and emotional abuse from director John Ford. She detailed this in her best-selling autobiography, ‘Tis Herself. In The Quiet Man, John Wayne memorably drags O’Hara down a hill, a hill Ford had covered with sheep dung.

Needless to say Maureen O’ Hara was an phenomenal actress who died recently, a year before she dies she won an Honorary Oscar award. O’ Hara be better represented for more attributes that made her who she was.

 

 

 

 

Owens: Boys vs girls

LA Johnson/ NPR

LA Johnson/ NPR

NPR has conducted a #15girlsseries. They begin with the statement. The world’s girls are healthier than ever. They live longer and more of them are going to school than at any time in history. But most of them face discrimination simply because they are girls. The discrimination happens at every point in their lives. The comment “simply because they are girls states that they have a vies of girls being lower than boys already” The stereotypes within this articles defines young girls as throw aways and less than because of popular demands.

According to NPR girls ages 10 to 19, an age range used by the World Bank and other groups to track populations Worldwide, about 600 million girls fall into this age range. Nearly half of them live in just seven countries. Girls are being aborted just based off their gender. NPR noted On average, about 105 boys are born worldwide for every 100 girls. Girls tend to make up for this difference over time because of their greater resilience and resistance to disease. As noted why do girls have to “make up a difference?” and to say they overtime come up because their resistance to diseases than boys is a stereotype society had placed on girls.

n India and China, the birth of a son is cause for celebration. The family has gained a future asset: a child who can earn money for his parents and support them when they are old.

 

That’s not the case for girls. “It’s more expensive for a family to have girls than boys,” says Charles Kenny, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. A boy has greater earning potential in these societies because there is a stigma against women working outside the home.

Within this statement A major stereotype has presented women as lower in their livelihood and what they can produce as women. They man is automatically celebrated as the man of the hour due to this article and statistics because he’s simply a boy. That’s why female babies are being aborted because they are of lesser asset to our society than girls are unfortunately. Girls can be considered bread winners and should be celebrated as well. Stereotypes of the female general has shown that girls are naturally demand because they don’t hold the weight men and boys do.

http://www.npr.org/about-npr/446068521/how-15girls-are-changing-their-future-a-new-npr-series-begins-today


Jones: Immigrant Women battle with Domestic Violence

DomesticViolence_1

Women are already placed in a position were they are placed below men and are giving the adjectives of weak individuals who can not stand up on their own but immigrant women have so much more to worry about. Immigrant women are more likely experience domestic violence than any U.S. born women. The immigrant rights organization most enter as dependents on their spouse’s visa and no ability to work for themselves. This in return makes them more vulnerable to an abusive partner according to Tina Vasquez. Women and children are particularly vulnerable to abuse, both during the dangerous journey to the U.S. and while held in detention centers.

Domestic violence is a horrible situation for anyone to be a part of including any children that are around. There is one word that stood out to me while reading this article and that word is “vulnerable”. This word simple expresses to me that these women are not strong enough to hold their own regardless the circumstances or location. The adjectives used in this article are meant to tear down the image of immigrant women and for the audience to perceive them as weak individuals which defeats the who purpose of this article. This article was written to expose the truth about immigrant women and maybe receive help, but not to continue the hurt and humiliation.

http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2015/10/immigrant-women-need-protection-from-domestic-abuse.html